To get in touch
please fill in the quick enquiry form below

If you have any questions please give us a call on
01772 562084

To get in touch
please fill in the quick enquiry form below

If you have any questions please give us a call on
01772 562084

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Loss of Sight Compensation Claims

 

The Royal National Institute of Blind People states that every single day, 250 people will begin to lose their sight. What is even more saddening is that over half of all sight loss is actually avoidable.

While our eyesight deteriorate naturally over time, sudden loss of vision can often be a result of injury and illness. If you have been affected by loss of sight and it was no fault of your own, you may be able to claim loss of sight compensation.

Common Loss of Sight Compensation Claims

Under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013, The Health and Safety Executive states that an injury which could potentially lead to sight loss of any severity should be reported to the employer and relevant bodies.

Sight loss can be a result of a variety of injuries or illnesses, including;

Head injuries

Head injuries are one of the more common factors in the sudden loss of vision. If an injury affects certain areas of the brain, vision can be adversely affected, sometimes permanently.

If there is a higher risk of head injury, it is essential that the employers provide employees with adequate personal protection equipment to protect their head. This should be in the form of protective headgear. Training should also be given so that the employees are aware of head injury risks and understand how to manage said risks.

Direct Injury to the Eye

Without protection, the eyes can be very vulnerable, especially if the environment has debris floating around the air, or duties cause dust and small parts to be expelled into the air.

Working with machines, there’s always a risk of dust or left over material kicking up while the machine is in operation, often near the eye.

If there is a risk of debris and particles floating around an environment, it is the employer’s responsibility to ensure that there is adequate eye protection available as part of the personal protective equipment kit and, where possible, adequate ventilation to help remove some of the debris from the air.

It is also possible to claim compensation for loss of sight in one eye – the damage doesn’t have to involve both eyes.

Contact with Chemicals

If you work with harmful, hazardous substances, it is essential that protective eye equipment is used. Employers are responsible for finding less-harmful alternatives which reduce the risk of chemical injury to the body, including the eyes.

Some alternatives may not be able to be swapped in, and in this case, extra precautions should be taken to carefully handle the substance, with minimal handling being one of the precautions.

If chemicals come into contact with the eyes, the consequences can be severe, so training should be completed by all staff and first aiders to ensure that the correct procedure is followed should a chemical accident occur.

Medical Negligence

Although rare, there is a chance of running into medical negligence following surgery around your eye area or even within your brain. This could mean partial or complete blindness as a result of a surgery complication which could have been avoided.

Have you have suffered loss of sight in the last three years? Was is due to someone else’s negligence? We can help you with your case, even if you are only seeking compensation for loss of sight in one eye.

Call us today on 01772562084 or complete our loss of sight compensation claim form below.

 

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